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Let's ditch sustainability surveys which tell us consumers pay more for sustainability - they don't. New tools, used responsibly, can properly analyse behavioural patterns. Article by Dara O'Rourke, The Guardian (Friday 25 July...

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Let's ditch sustainability surveys which tell us consumers pay more for sustainability - they don't. New tools, used responsibly, can properly analyse behavioural patterns. Article by Dara O'Rourke, The Guardian (Friday 25 July 2014).

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Market agency GFK sees a real opportunity for companies to help consumers in their quest for better health by offering products and services that complement consumers’ existing efforts.  Article by Matt Valle in GFK Insights Blog (Tuesday...

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Market agency GFK sees a real opportunity for companies to help consumers in their quest for better health by offering products and services that complement consumers’ existing efforts.  Article by Matt Valle in GFK Insights Blog (Tuesday 10 March 2015)

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Companies like Nike, Ford and Google are using gamification to shift peoples behavior, increase their skillsets and engage them with innovation. Article by Rachael Post in the Guardian, (Wednesday 11 June 2014 ).

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Companies like Nike, Ford and Google are using gamification to shift peoples behavior, increase their skillsets and engage them with innovation. Article by Rachael Post in the Guardian, (Wednesday 11 June 2014 ).

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You’re often manipulated to buy at the supermarket. Now hidden design tricks can sway you to pick healthier food without realising. Article by Veronique Greenwood, BBC Future (Friday 19 September 2014).

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You’re often manipulated to buy at the supermarket. Now hidden design tricks can sway you to pick healthier food without realising. Article by Veronique Greenwood, BBC Future (Friday 19 September 2014).

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David Halpern, a behavioural scientist who tries to figure out how government can work better, must feel like a pilgrim in an unholy land. After a career as an academic, he went to work in Downing Street to be chief analyst at Tony...

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David Halpern, a behavioural scientist who tries to figure out how government can work better, must feel like a pilgrim in an unholy land.

After a career as an academic, he went to work in Downing Street to be chief analyst at Tony Blair's Strategy Unit and later became the first chief executive of the government's Nudge Unit, which has led a quiet revolution in how we make policy, bringing academic rigour to the analysis of what policies work, how they could work better and why. In its five years of existence, the unit, officially the Behavioural Insights Team (BIT), has found how making tiny changes can boost the number of organ donors, help the Job Centre get 10 percent more people off benefits and into work, and increase the number of black and minority ethnic people passing a police recruitment exam.

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Abstract: Excessive drinking is a big problem. Although between 2010 and 2013 household spending on alcoholic drinks in the UK fell by 5.7%, liver disease in those under 30 has more than doubled over the past 20 years with Alcohol Concern...

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Abstract: Excessive drinking is a big problem. Although between 2010 and 2013 household spending on alcoholic drinks in the UK fell by 5.7%, liver disease in those under 30 has more than doubled over the past 20 years with Alcohol Concern estimating that 1.2m people a year are admitted to hospital for alcohol-related problems.

The health sector needs a new tactic to change people’s behaviour and this is where behavioural science, or “nudging”, can help. Behavioural science has worked in other areas. The Cabinet Office’s Behavioural Insights Team or Nudge Unit, as it is popularly known, experimented with income tax reminder letters and how they were framed. They found that the repayments rate increased by 15% when people were told most people living in their town or area had already paid. At a cost of very little, an extra £210m of tax revenue was brought into HMRC.

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Select committee calls for more evaluation from Behavioural Insights Team of its failures and successes. Article in The Observer by Jamie Doward (Saturday 26 July 2014).

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Select committee calls for more evaluation from Behavioural Insights Team of its failures and successes. Article in The Observer by Jamie Doward (Saturday 26 July 2014).

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Nudges, small design changes that can markedly affect individual behavior, have been catching on. These techniques rely on insights from behavioral science, and when used ethically, they can be very helpful. But we need to be sure that...

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Nudges, small design changes that can markedly affect individual behavior, have been catching on. These techniques rely on insights from behavioral science, and when used ethically, they can be very helpful. But we need to be sure that they aren’t being employed to sway people to make bad decisions that they will later regret.

Whenever I’m asked to autograph a copy of “Nudge,” the book I wrote with Cass Sunstein, the Harvard law professor, I sign it, “Nudge for good.” Unfortunately, that is meant as a plea, not an expectation (more…)

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Behavioural economics is changing regulation. Payday lending is a target. In 2010 the Conservative-led government established a team—known affectionately as the “nudge unit”—to investigate how behavioural economics could be used to improve...

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Behavioural economics is changing regulation. Payday lending is a target. In 2010 the Conservative-led government established a team—known affectionately as the “nudge unit”—to investigate how behavioural economics could be used to improve policy. Behavioural economists argue that consumers are not hyper-rational but have predictable biases, and they use insights from experiments to make models imitate reality more closely. The nudge unit was so successful at finding clever policy insights that it was part-privatised and has been advising other governments. Now, behavioural economics is changing the way Britain’s regulators think about the markets they regulate. Article in The Economist (Saturday 18 October 2014).

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European nations can cut billions of euros from citizens’ power bills using psychology to nudge them into consuming less, says energy-management business Opower Inc. Using data and behavioral-science insights, popularized in the book...

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European nations can cut billions of euros from citizens’ power bills using psychology to nudge them into consuming less, says energy-management business Opower Inc. Using data and behavioral-science insights, popularized in the book “Nudge” by Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein, utilities can cut consumption as much as 3 percent, Opower said. Article by Alex Morales, Bloomberg (Friday 29 August 2014).

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Every second German weighs too much. Now Agriculture and Nutrition Minister Christian Schmidt (CSU)  has new ways to combat obesity, especially among young people - with unusual approaches, including nudging. Article by Claudia Ehrenstein...

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Every second German weighs too much. Now Agriculture and Nutrition Minister Christian Schmidt (CSU)  has new ways to combat obesity, especially among young people - with unusual approaches, including nudging. Article by Claudia Ehrenstein and Jochen Gaugele in Die Welt (in German) (Monday 17 November, 2014).

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Robert Cialdini has a modest proposal. He would like businesses to carve out a new role of chief persuasion officer – or CPO for short. There is self-interest at play here. After all, Professor Cialdini is a persuasion expert and exponent...

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Robert Cialdini has a modest proposal. He would like businesses to carve out a new role of chief persuasion officer – or CPO for short. There is self-interest at play here. After all, Professor Cialdini is a persuasion expert and exponent of “persuasion science”. Thirty years ago, the psychologist established his credentials when he published the best-seller Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion and became known as the “godfather of influence”. As well as his academic work – today Prof Cialdini is Regents’ Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing at Arizona State University – he has sold his expertise to the likes of Google, Merrill Lynch and Nato. Article in the Financial Times by Emma Jacobs (Monday 22 September 2014).

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The Italian TV channel  TV7 featured a news report on nudging and anticipatory computing, hosted by Barbara Carfagna (in Italian).

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The Italian TV channel  TV7 featured a news report on nudging and anticipatory computing, hosted by Barbara Carfagna (in Italian).

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"While attaching a cost to something that was free certainly reduces frivolous consumption, cost that is too low can merely act to pay off one’s conscience'' - The Guardian's Ally Fogg weighs in on the introduction of a cost of previously...

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"While attaching a cost to something that was free certainly reduces frivolous consumption, cost that is too low can merely act to pay off one’s conscience'' - The Guardian's Ally Fogg weighs in on the introduction of a cost of previously free products (Thursday 17 July 2014).

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